Recent Posts

Emerson Matsuuchi: an interview with the designer of Specter OPS

Those who know me know that I love games in the 'hidden movement' genre. On New Year's eve I published my top 50 games in a blog on boardgamegeek with Specter OPS top of the pile. It is my favourite game so I decided to seek an interview with the designer, Emerson Matsuuchi. Here is that conversation, for your enjoyment. You can also click here for our Specter OPS review.

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Specter OPS: a review

Background

Specter Ops was a 2015 release by Plaid Hat Games and designer Emerson Matsuuchi and belongs to the hidden movement genre, a mechanism I have found very enjoyable and frankly under-used in board gaming. Try and think of a few...you'll probably name Fury of Dracula, Letters from Whitechapel and Scotland Yard; there are others of course but these are arguably the most famous games in this category. Scotland Yard is a light family game, Letters from Whitechapel is a bit more grizzly thanks to its theme but the gameplay is fairly straightforward, and Fury of Dracula is a deeper and longer experience that has benefited from two new editions over the years, the latest also released in 2015.

Specter Ops board

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Call for contributors

Ever wanted to see your name in lights? Dreaming of your 5 minutes of fame?

We are looking for bloggers who are a little bit different; people who write for the fun of it; people who adore table top gaming. If you're interested in blogging on The Great Indoors then please email Peter .

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Waggle Dance: a review

Background

Waggle Dance was released in 2014 by Grublin Games and designed by Mike Nudd. As is standard operation for Cornwall-based publishers Grublin Games, the game was crowdfunded by a Kickstarter campaign and is now available from retailers. Speaking personally, it can be frustrating when a game is created for a Kickstarter campaign but then unavailable for those who didn't back it. No fear of that with Grublin Games: we salute you!

Waggle Dance

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My board gaming genesis

I got into board gaming through a friend at church, the right honourable Neil Curtis. Because he's an unassuming, diffident kind of chap, he let me pick the games from his collection that I wanted to play. Rather than condescending by starting me off with 'gateway' games, he let me chart the course, probably reasoning that it's more important to garner enthusiasm for this wonderful hobby than to insist on starting with simpler games and moving from there.

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