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Episode XXVII

We were once again sans Steve, and Leon just now got around to watching Rogue One, so it was feeling like a Star Wars: Rebellion night.

Star Wars Rebellion box

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The Unboxing of a Gaming Group

Part 1: All the Great Ones Have an Origin Story

Heroes, villains, gaming groups......the really interesting ones are only interesting because of how they came to be. And most of them came to be as a result of some accident or strange twist of fate. The Fun Group is no exception.

The Fun Group

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Hello, I don't speak board games

So, I recently joined a board games group. For context, I have always loved board games. My family and friends also enjoy board games. It’s just unfortunate that they don’t enjoy board games half as much as I do. Consequently, after over a decade of patient participation I decided to give my loved ones a break and indulge my ludological longings elsewhere.

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Call for contributors

Ever wanted to see your name in lights? Dreaming of your 5 minutes of fame?

We are looking for bloggers who are a little bit different; people who write for the fun of it; people who adore table top gaming. If you're interested in blogging on The Great Indoors then please email Peter .

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Playing cooperative games can feel like being the fat kid on sports day

I haven't played a great deal of cooperative games and I'm happy to admit I thoroughly enjoyed T.I.M.E Stories, Xenoshyft: Onslaught and Ghost Stories. However, in general I have mixed feelings about games that involve working collaboratively. Each person comes to the game with their own expectations and strategic approach. Where do I fit in this team pursuing victory? It takes a mature group to allow each person to use their unique strengths and also to allow individuals to make mistakes. As much as I've enjoyed co-ops, the hours spent around the table aren't always relaxing and can have their uncomfortable moments.

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How do you interpret when ambiguity strikes?

Family favourite: Arcadia Quest

Arcadia Quest

The kids and I have started a new gaming tradition in the school summer holidays: we set aside 2 weeks to play Arcadia Quest that normally takes us about 20 hours to complete. Arcadia Quest, for 2-4 players, is a campaign game with 11 scenarios in which you have to complete six. I was originally drawn to the game by its awesome miniatures which I've tried to paint, starting with the Goblin Archers. The city of Arcadia is currently controlled by the vampire Lord Fang and his evil minions and monsters. Players take over guilds of 3 heroes, each of whom have unique abilities. These heroes' powers become stronger over the game so that you can finally destroy Lord Fang. However don't become complacent as the other guilds want to have prestige and they don't mind killing you to achieve this!

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Theme & Competitive Strategy together will bring balance to the force

As a family we love watching Star Wars. As soon as I noticed the game Risk: Star Wars Edition, I had to purchase it. It’s for 2-4 players although I believe it's best played with just 2 players. The game is based on The Return of the Jedi with 3 different and concurrent battles: the fight between Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader, the battle of star ships trying to destroy the Death Star and the fight on Endor with the rebels trying to bring down the shield generator.

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"It's not you, it's me".....The value of playing again

Yesterday I had the opportunity to take some time off work and play a couple of games with friends. There is something delightful about spending a day playing instead of the normal gaming night where you only really get a couple of hours to get through a game. You don't feel rushed and you can take your time learning your latest addition. On this occasion I got to play Viticulture for the first time and Blood Rage for the second time. Whilst playing both these games I was able to observe my thoughts, emotions and behaviour, which sounds a little like a CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) activity.

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My relationship with the Rule Book: it's complicated.

Gamers create a wish list of table top games for many different reasons. As I've mentioned before I'm drawn to games by their artwork alone. Obviously once I'm drawn in I do my homework in terms of taste and playability. Then the only thing left to do is to click the purchase button (if it’s actually in stock!) and wait for that well packaged cardboard box to arrive. I carefully open my parcel to reveal my latest addition to the family and check that the game has been safely delivered with all its fingers and toes. Yet I’m only fully emotionally committed once I break the cellophane that seals the board game. The final hurdle is meeting my nemesis... he Rule Book!

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"For someone with Dyslexia, you've chosen an interesting hobby"

Recently a fellow board gamer commented, "for someone with Dyslexia you've chosen an interesting hobby." By that he meant gaming can be pretty complex and challenging. This certainly made me think about what attracted me to table top gaming.

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My board gaming genesis

I got into board gaming through a friend at church, the right honourable Neil Curtis. Because he's an unassuming, diffident kind of chap, he let me pick the games from his collection that I wanted to play. Rather than condescending by starting me off with 'gateway' games, he let me chart the course, probably reasoning that it's more important to garner enthusiasm for this wonderful hobby than to insist on starting with simpler games and moving from there.

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